Rural business leader backs simplification of planning process to boost rural business development

Giving evidence to the House of Commons Growth and Infrastructure Bill Committee, Country Land & Business Association (CLA) president Harry Cotterell has called for a less costly and bureaucratic planning system to encourage rural growth.

Harry Cotterell - image:CLA
Harry Cotterell - image:CLA
Explaining how the complexity of the planning sytem puts off small businesses in particular from applying, he said: "A lot of the information is not really necessary for a very small development or small proposal. There are CLA members who live on the top of a hill who have required flood risk assessments, which is plainly ridiculous but very rarely costs less than £1,000."

In this, he welcomed the Bill's amendment to reduce the amount of information required to bring developments forward, and added: "The National Planning Policy Framework will greatly improve the planning environment for small rural businesses and we are very much in favour of the presumption for sustainable development."

The CLA has also welcomed the Government's confirmation of new permitted development rights for non-contentious conversion of agricultural buildings. Cotterell said this recognised that a lot of development in rural areas is "virtually of no significance to the wider population, beyond what is going on in a farmyard".

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

Upcoming reforms to water abstraction licensing will for the first time cap the amount of water that fruit growers can take for trickle irrigation.

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

At a debate during last week's Fruit Focus trade show in Kent, senior industry figures painted a bleak picture of an increasingly difficult seasonal labour market that is already impacting on investment.

What will post-Brexit pesticides authorisation and capital support for fresh produce look like?

What will post-Brexit pesticides authorisation and capital support for fresh produce look like?

The likely impact on seasonal labour has dominated discussions of the consequences of withdrawal from the EU for UK production horticulture.