Royal Holloway research set to probe nutrients

Research at Royal Holloway, University of London, could help breeders of crops such as tomatoes produce new varieties with higher concentrations of health-related nutrients.

Researcher Genny Enfissi told the conference that the amounts of these substances in commercial tomato varieties was controlled by a limited gene-pool. A research programme at the college is mapping the genes of both commercial tomato varieties and wild ancestors, land races and closely-related species to identify the genes responsible for a range of characteristics, including the content of particular nutrients.

"The information can be used in conventional breeding programmes to help breeders identify parent lines and seedlings from crosses, with the qualities they are looking for," said Enfissi.

- A water-soluble tomato concentrate is the only product approved so far under the EFSA's article 13.5 procedure (see main story). The EFSA has approved the claim, by functional food and dietary supplement producer Provexis, that eating it "helps maintain normal platelet aggregation, which contributes to healthy blood flow".


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

This spring, many top-fruit growers in the UK and across Europe were dismayed to discover that swathes of their orchards had been hit by frost.

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

Upcoming reforms to water abstraction licensing will for the first time cap the amount of water that fruit growers can take for trickle irrigation.

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

At a debate during last week's Fruit Focus trade show in Kent, senior industry figures painted a bleak picture of an increasingly difficult seasonal labour market that is already impacting on investment.


Follow us on:
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google +
Horticulture Jobs
More Horticulture Jobs

Pest & Disease Tracker bulletin 

The latest pest and disease alerts, how to treat them, plus EAMU updates, sent direct to your inbox.

Sign up here

Professor Geoffrey Dixon

GreenGene International chair Geoff Dixon on the business of fresh produce production
 

Read Professor Geoffrey Dixon