RHS to highlight benefits of microscopic garden organisms at Hampton Court

Microscopic garden organisms will be celebrated in a scientific garden at the RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show from the 8-13 July.

The RHS Invisible Garden will allow visitors to magnify usually unseen organisms, including plants and insects, to more than 1,000 times their actual size. RHS scientists will be on hand to provide advice on how to create environments in which these beneficial organisms can thrive.

Among the organism under scrutiny will be lacewing larvae, a butterfly's wing, carnivorous plants and rotifers.

RHS director of science Dr Alistair Griffiths said: "The Invisible Garden is an opportunity for people to learn more about the amazing microscopic world in their gardens and the benefits these truly astounding organisms bring.

"We believe that by raising the profile of these garden heroes and letting people know more about the crucial role they play in supporting biodiversity and us, that they will be inspired to do more in their own gardens to support wildlife, from the smallest rotifer to birds and mammals.

"Throughout the show RHS scientists will be on-hand to provide simple advice on the things gardeners can do to encourage and support biodiversity; from planting a mix of trees shrubs and flowering plants to encourage a wide range of wildlife, to attracting beetles by not clearing dead wood and logs, as they provide a perfect habitat for insects."


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