Public hearing on glyphosate gets underway at European Parliament

A public hearing 'The Monsanto papers and glyphosate,' organised by the European Parliament's Committees on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, and on Agriculture and Rural Development, starts on 11 October.

The papers are documents released through lawsuits in the United States brought against Monsanto by more than 250 people alleging that exposure to Roundup herbicide is responsible for their cancers.

The EU is currently hearing discussions as it investigates whether or not to extend the license for herbicide glyphosate, used in Roundup, for 10 years. A vote is expected later this year.

The EU granted an 18-month extension in July 2016  after failing to agree on a proposed 15-year licence renewal.

The European Chemical Agency (ECHA) decided in March that glyphosate should not be classified as causing cancer.

At the 11 October meeting, the science behind the assessment of glyphosate will be presented by anti-glyphosate campaigner Prof Christopher J. Portier, of Maastricht University; Dr Kate Guyton, International Agency for Research on Cancer; and Dr José Tarazona, Head of Pesticides Unit, EFSA.

Panel two will discuss 'Transparency and use of scientific studies in the risk assessment of glyphosate - lessons learned from the US' with anti-glyphosate author Carey Gillam, U.S. Right to Know; and Prof David Kirkland, Kirkland Consulting.

Panel three will discuss 'Transparency and use of scientific studies in the risk assessment of glyphosate - lessons learned for the European Unio' withn Martin Pigeon, Corporate Europe Observatory Presentation'; and Tim Bowmer, chairman of the ECHA Committee for Risk Assessment.

EFSA and ECHA have said their clearing of glyphosate "came to their independent conclusion based on the original data and not on someone else’s interpretation". 


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