Programmes offer guidance to garden retailers on phase-out of peat

The Waste & Resources Action Programme is funding two schemes to help garden retailers reduce peat.

The two programmes, being run by sustainability consultant Newleaf, aim to help businesses develop a plan to reduce their peat use, in line with Defra's 2020 target for the amateur gardening market and the work being done by the sustainable growing-media task force.

"The first programme talks multiple retailers and garden centre groups through all the impacts peat has on their business," said Newleaf founder Charles Drewe. "It looks at the peat they are directly responsible for and indirect impacts such as peat used by manufacturers.

"This can give options for reduction. Some are straightforward and would be quick wins, while others would be long-term projects."

The second scheme will involve hands-on training for smaller garden centres. "It will enable 10 businesses in England and 10 in Scotland to take part," said Drewe.

"The workshops will look at alternatives available and the dilutants. We will be promoting good practice and won't make a judgement on products. We will look at the way they can be used and the benefits of each one.

"We will provide information so that they can explain things to customers - for example, why green waste is so much heavier than coir." The schemes will run until March next year.


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

This spring, many top-fruit growers in the UK and across Europe were dismayed to discover that swathes of their orchards had been hit by frost.

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

Upcoming reforms to water abstraction licensing will for the first time cap the amount of water that fruit growers can take for trickle irrigation.

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

At a debate during last week's Fruit Focus trade show in Kent, senior industry figures painted a bleak picture of an increasingly difficult seasonal labour market that is already impacting on investment.