Produce World chairman Paul Wilkinson retires

Paul Wilkinson, non-executive chairman at Produce World, is retiring after six years in the post.

Under his leadership, the company's sales have more than tripled, with annual bottomand top-line growth over the same period.

Chief executive officer William Burgess said: "Paul has been an outstanding chairman, supporting me and my executive team through some very challenging and exciting times. He leaves the business in great shape and in a position to take on future challenges.

"While the first half of 2010 was a particularly difficult trading period, we are very confident about the year ahead. We wish Paul the very best of luck with his other ventures."

Produce World is now searching for a successor to Wilkinson - with the support of global executive search expert Boyden.


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