Potato roguers course set to prepare field workers to recognise signs of diseases

Scottish Agricultural College's Aberdeen campus will host a potato roguers course in June, enabling candidates to earn more than £3,000 in the run-up to harvest while maintaining the health of the Scottish seed potato crop.

Trainees will be taught to walk fields looking for signs of blackleg, mosaic virus and other diseases, and then remove the affected plants before they can contaminate any others.

The certified course costs £288, all or part of which may be met by Individual Learning Account funding. Students sit a final test in which they have to identify a variety, whether it is healthy and, if not, which disease it is showing. The college said it also hoped to run a one-day refresher course.

Four-fifths of UK seed potatoes are grown in Scotland, in an industry worth £75m a year.


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