Potato consumers urged to 'trade up'

Potato Council marketing campaign valued at £370,000 will aim to reach 6.9 million families.

Potatoes: campaign timed to coincide with main crop harvesting
Potatoes: campaign timed to coincide with main crop harvesting

Potatoes

A Potato Council marketing push this autumn will encourage shoppers to "trade up" from generic potatoes to named varieties.

Valued at £370,000, the campaign will aim to reach 6.9 million families through advertisements in food and lifestyle magazines as well as online. The main focus will be on Maris Piper, considered the most widely recognised variety, but it will also urge shoppers to choose varieties appropriate to what they intend to cook.

The levy body has again commissioned best-selling author and food expert Jo Pratt to develop new Maris Piper recipes to demonstrate that named varieties are worth paying "a little bit more for".

Consumers will also be encouraged to share their own Maris Piper recipes via social media channels.

Potato Council marketing manager Kate Cox said: "Our campaign is deliberately timed to coincide with main crop harvesting. Building shopper awareness around the importance of using named varieties for more consistent results will not only improve their dining experience but it will deliver a real boost to the sector."

The drive will also reinforce the Potato Council's signposting initiative, which groups varieties with smooth, fluffy or salad characteristics, she explained, and urged the industry to support such efforts. Potato Week takes place on 6-12 October.

Debate secured

The Potato Council has helped to secure a debate in the Scottish Parliament, during which MSPs from the three largest parties praised the industry's contribution to the economy, public health and sustainability.

Potato Council marketing and PR executive Stu Baker said securing the debate was "a fantastic achievement", adding; "By delivering these messages to policy makers, we can help ensure that potatoes remain a firm fixture on Scottish plates."


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