Police promote prickly hedges for defensive planting scheme

Essex Police has recommended creeping juniper, blue spruce, climbing roses, holly, bamboo, firethorn, blackthorn, oleaster, berberis and giant rhubarb as a natural barrier to burglars.

Essex Police's 'Secured by Design' garden suggests "thinking carefully about security and the layout of your garden can help protect it and your home from crime.

"Working with Parker's Garden Company in Frinton and local businesses and organisations, Essex Police has created a real life garden specially designed to highlight some of the simple steps you can take to reduce the risk of becoming a victim of crime.

"The garden is the first of its kind and can help visitors to the nursery learn how extra security can help protect their garden and their home."

The plan suggests securing your shed, keeping fences and plants in the front garden below one metre in height to not give potential burglars somewhere to hide, reinforcing the garden’s perimeter by planting prickly shrubs or a thorny hedge and train them to grow on trellis on top of 1.8 metre fencing to deter potential offenders, using lighting, gravel, and securing pots and oil tanks.

The council and police have also joined forces with Poplar Nurseries garden centre in Marks Tey, Colchester Council and the Safer Colchester Partnership to put together the 'Defensive Planting' scheme.


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