Phytophthora ramorum found on Japanese larch in survey

Tree experts spotted an outbreak of Phytophthora ramorum disease in larch trees after a recent aerial survey of woodland.

Tell-tale signs were spotted in private woodlands north of Newton Stewart, west Scotland, in the third outbreak on Japanese larch in the country this year. The first two were found on trees on the Craignish peninsula and island of Mull.

Resinous lesions characterise the disease, which turns wilting tree needles grey or blackish and can kill a tree within a few months. The only way to contain the disease is to chop down affected and surrounding trees.

Forestry Commission Scotland tree-health policy adviser Hugh Clayden said: "We are working with land managers to confirm the extent of the infections and the measures required to deal with them. We ask woodland owners to remain vigilant and report any suspected signs of tree disease."


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

Horticulture education update - staying on course

Horticulture education update - staying on course

Raised levels of investment in horticulture education and increased student take-up is welcome news for the industry, says Rachel Anderson.

Tree planting guide - three basic rules

Tree planting guide - three basic rules

Choosing the right plant, correct planting procedure and best aftercare are the three basic rules for sucessful tree planting, Sally Drury explains.

Tree planting - what are the benefits of planting trees?

Tree planting - what are the benefits of planting trees?

Mitigating climate change, providing windbreaks and reducing the risk of soil erosion are some of the best reasons for planting trees, says Sally Drury.


Follow us on:
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google +
Horticulture Jobs
More Horticulture Jobs

Arboriculture Contracts & Tenders

Jeremy Barrell On...

Jeremy Barrell

Tree consultant Jeremy Barrell reflects on the big issues in arboriculture.

Products & Kit Resources