Pesticides amnesty announced

Plans have been unveiled for an amnesty of redundant pesticides and biocides, in a bid to protect people, wildlife and the environment.

Any unwanted, out-of-date or revoked pesticides and biocides can be disposed of from January 3 to March 14 2011 as part of Project SOE (Security in the Operational Environment).

Registration will start on December 17 and a one-off registration fee of £20 is payable to Killgerm Chemicals Ltd who are administering the amnesty.

Growers must provide a list of the pesticides and biocides they are disposing, with quantities and information about the condition of the packaging.  Disposal of extra pesticides not originally listed will cost £20.

The NFU welcomed the announcement and vice president Gwyn Jones said:  "This is a great opportunity to check your stores and dispose of anything that is out of date or no longer legal."


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