NFU deal allows growers to sell more produce in London

A deal struck by the NFU and the Greater London Authority (GLA) has handed British growers the chance to sell more produce at some of the capital's biggest wholesale markets.

The NFU assumed responsibility for managing the Business Development Managers (BDM) programme on 1 November – an initiative aiming to increase the supply of local, regional and sustainable food into the city by working with market traders and the food-supply chain.

Promoting Red Tractor produce and providing business support for market tenants will be amongst the objectives of the programme, as well as advice on procurement and establishing wholesale markets as hubs for local produce.

NFU head of food chain unit Lee Woodger said: "This programme offers a fantastic opportunity for British growers to develop their business into new markets with BDMs being able to act as a broker to the traders at each of the markets at no cost. Anyone who wishes to find out more about the programme should get in touch with the NFU or the BDMs directly."

Funded by the GLA, the programme is part of the Mayor of London’s Food Strategy: Healthy and Sustainable Food for London.


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