NFU consults on changes to WCA

The NFU's horticulture section is asking any growers affected by the proposed changes to the Wildlife & Countryside Act (WCA) 1981 to contact it by 25 January.

Defra is proposing to add 36 plant species to Schedule 9 of the WCA, which would prohibit the introduction of these species to the wild. Many are known as invasive weeds, such as Himalayan balsam, but the NFU is concerned that the list includes several common garden plants grown by the trade.

Defra is also consulting on whether to ban sales of Rhododendron ponticum and its hybrids. The NFU is particularly interested to hear from Rhododendron growers.

The full list of species proposed for inclusion on Schedule 9 can be found in the consultation document on the Defra website.

- Contact horticulture adviser Chris Hartfield on 02476 858630 or chris.hartfield@nfu.org.uk. The consultation ends on 31 January.


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