New NFU report highlights continuing pressures on UK fresh produce sector

The NFU today (5 November) launched a new report, Catalyst Revisited, assessing progress, or lack of it, on the issues it raised in its 2012 Catalyst for Change report on the challenges facing British growers.

Image: NFU
Image: NFU

The report highlights positives of some retailers moving towards fairer treatment of suppliers and some successes brought by the Groceries Code Adjudicator.

But it says a culture of intense price pressure and competition for market share still pervades the industry,

It points out that UK self-sufficiency in fruit and vegetables continues to fall, while the value of imported produce is increasing, creating a UK trade deficit of £4.7 billion in fruit and vegetables in 2014.

  • Full analysis and reaction in next week's Horticulture Week magazine.

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