New-generation slug pellet Sluxx has potential benefits, say 85% of farmers

A slug pellet hailed as a "new generation" of molluscicide is being branded a big hit by its maker.

Sluxx is suitable for potato and outdoor salad and brassica crops, said Certis, which boasts that 85 per cent of the UK's "leading potato farmers recognise its potential benefits to crops".

Certis' product manager Lucie Hulin said the success rate was not entirely unexpected given restrictions on products containing methiocarb and metaldehyde. Slugs gobbled the pellets, stopped feeding and could not recover, she said. They burrowed underground where they died a few days later.

Research for Certis involved interviews with over 500 potato growers representing more than 28,000ha potatoes. The feedback was "unprecedented", Hulin said.

"Sluxx represents a new generation of molluscicide that performs on a par with both the other two active ingredients available.

"It has a strong environmental profile, being derived from active ingredient components that occur naturally in soils, which break down into plant nutrients.

"It's a high-quality bait pellet that contains the active ingredient ferric phosphate. Tests showed the pellets will withstand at least 25mm rainfall and still kill slugs."

Sluxx has a maximum dose rate of 28kg per ha with a maximum individual dose rate of 7kg per ha and has no harvest interval, she said.


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

This spring, many top-fruit growers in the UK and across Europe were dismayed to discover that swathes of their orchards had been hit by frost.

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

Upcoming reforms to water abstraction licensing will for the first time cap the amount of water that fruit growers can take for trickle irrigation.

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

At a debate during last week's Fruit Focus trade show in Kent, senior industry figures painted a bleak picture of an increasingly difficult seasonal labour market that is already impacting on investment.