Monty Don says grow-your-own trend will remain popular when media interest dies

TV gardener Monty Don says growing your own will continue even when the media "fad" for allotments and self-sufficiency is over.

Monty Don Image: Ideal Home Show
Monty Don Image: Ideal Home Show

Don, promoting the Ideal Home Show (Earl's Court until 5 April), said: "It's disingenuous to think the media don't help. The media has fads but I'd like to think [grow-your-own is] above that.

"You probably know I have quite extreme views. You need to grow your own, not just want to. This is not just a horticulture fad. People are realising some ownership of their food. We have been divorced from our means of production. If people grow a pot of basil on the windowsill, in a modest way they are proactively feeding themselves.

"The forces are stacked against that. There is no incentive for people. I've talked to growers who said: 'If gardeners grow their own food, who is going to buy ours?'"

Don will start filming BBC TV programme Italian Gardens this year and said he would like to revisit areas from his Around the World in 80 Gardens series such as German, Czech and Russian gardening.

He added: "To me [environmental, organic and ecological gardening] is not about moral kudos, but a sustainable way to carry on."

Don revealed that he had not visited a garden centre for a decade. He said he was not against selling exotic plants but advocated the promotion of natives.


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