Landscape architects fight to get improved recognition in Europe

Getting landscape architecture recognised as a profession across Europe will be an "uphill struggle", according to the new president of the European Foundation for Landscape Architecture (EFLA).

Nigel Thorne, who will officially take up his role on 1 January, told HW that several countries across Europe still do not see the full value of the profession.

He added that reversing that trend will be "top of the list" in his leadership of the EFLA.

"If we haven't got recognition of the profession in long-established countries then that is a pretty dire situation," said Thorne, who was president of the Landscape Institute until Neil Williamson took over in 2008. "The very first thing we'll be trying to do is get the professional qualification recognised in its own right, which will take time."

The issue is with using the term "architect", he explained, because some countries wish to retain the word solely for buildings architects rather than allowing it to be used to describe the landscape architecture qualification. "That is an uphill struggle," said Thorne.

Countries where the issue needed to be addressed include France, Portugal, Italy and Turkey, along with some eastern European states, he added.

Working closely with other organisations that represent architects and town planners would help raise landscape architects' profile, Thorne suggested.

The EFLA is now moving to new premises adjacent to the European Council of Town Planners to help co-ordinate work.

Another priority for Thorne will be ensuring that countries signed up to the European Landscape Convention are serious about its aims of promoting the landscape.

"I want to challenge all the countries that have ratified the convention to say what they are actually doing and how they are monitoring that," he explained.

 

Subscribe to Horticulture Week for more news, more in-depth features and more technical and market info.


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

Horticulture education update - staying on course

Horticulture education update - staying on course

Raised levels of investment in horticulture education and increased student take-up is welcome news for the industry, says Rachel Anderson.

Tree planting guide - three basic rules

Tree planting guide - three basic rules

Choosing the right plant, correct planting procedure and best aftercare are the three basic rules for sucessful tree planting, Sally Drury explains.

Tree planting - what are the benefits of planting trees?

Tree planting - what are the benefits of planting trees?

Mitigating climate change, providing windbreaks and reducing the risk of soil erosion are some of the best reasons for planting trees, says Sally Drury.


 
Horticulture Jobs
More Horticulture Jobs

Industry Data

An exclusive report for HW subscribers revealing the key development trends, clients and locations for 2017.

Are you a landscape supplier?

Horticulture Week Landscape Project Leads

If so, you should be receiving our new service for Horticulture Week subscribers delivering landscape project leads from live, approved, planning applications across the UK.

Landscape Contracts & Tenders

Products & Kit Resources

BALI National Landscape Awards 2016

Read all about the winning projects in the awards, run in association with Horticulture Week.

Noel Farrer

Founding partner of Farrer Huxley Associates Noel Farrer on landscape and green space
 

Read Noel Farrer