Joint development delivers seedless pepper into stores

A seedless snacking pepper, Angello, has hit the shelves of Marks & Spencer.

The result of 15 years' development between the retailer, Melrow Salads of Merseyside, and breeder Syngenta, the new variety is claimed not only to be the first seedless variety, but also to have higher sweetness levels and a strong crunch.

Melrow produce development manager Bernard Sparkes said: "It's really exciting to introduce an amazing new variety of vegetable to the high street. Having a seedless pepper not only saves preparation time, but also this new variety tastes delicious too."

Syngenta business manager Luciano Fioramonti added: "The pepper is the ultimate healthy convenience food because it is packed full of vitamin C."

Although developed in the UK, the peppers are grown in southern Spain, Israel and the Netherlands. They sell for £1.79 per 100g.


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