JCB changes drivetrain name

JCB plans to harness the strength of its brand to develop the sale of axles, transmissions and drivetrains to global markets.

JCB today announced plans to harness the strength of its brand to develop the sale of axles, transmissions and drivetrains to global markets.

These components are currently sold to third party OEMs through a JCB business known as International Transmissions Ltd (ITL). But from April 2, ITL is changing its name to JCB Drivetrain Systems Ltd.

Malcolm Sandford, managing director of JCB’s Engine and Transmissions businesses, said:

"The change of name from ITL to JCB Drivetrain Systems Ltd will enable us to develop sales of axles, transmissions and drivetrains into the emerging markets of South America, India, Russia and the Far East, where JCB’s brand recognition is extremely strong."

JCB Drivetrain Systems Ltd, based in Wrexham, the home of JCB Transmissions, will supply customers with axles, transmissions and integrated drivetrain solutions including the JCB Dieselmax engine where it is part of a package.

JCB Power Systems Ltd, based in Foston, Derbyshire, will continue to supply  JCB Dieselmax engines as separate units through its distribution and dealer network and directly to OEMs.

JCB began selling axles and transmissions to OEMs through ITL in 1985 and the product range includes steer and rigid drive axles with a dynamic load capacity of 3 to 12 tonnes and transmissions with a nominal power rating of 50 to 130kW.  The company sells to the construction, materials handling, industrial, agricultural, mining, marine, aviation and leisure sectors.


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