Growers encouraged to register for Potato Council's primary schools project

Growers are reminded that there is still time to get local schools involved in this year's Grow Your Own Potatoes project -- the largest primary school growing project from the potato industry.

More than 10,000 primary schools have already registered to take part in the scheme, which helps to educate young children about potatoes.

Having now formed partnerships with Farming & Countryside Education (FACE), the British Nutrition Foundation and Peter Seabrook MBE, Grow Your Own Potatoes is on course to reach more young children and build their understanding of where potatoes come from, how they grow and their role in a healthy balanced diet - and, of course, build future demand for potatoes.

Planting takes place in March and classrooms will unearth their crop in June. This year the prizes on offer include an allotment makeover for the school that yields the heaviest crop and runner-up prizes of eco-friendly picnic tables and playground benches.

Peter Seabrook said: "Youngsters love growing potatoes and there is great excitement come harvest time to see what tips out of the pots."

FACE head of education Bill Graham added: "There is no doubt that Grow Your Own Potatoes is a flagship project that is really making a difference. The key to its success is that it is just so easy to take part and the project can be incorporated into the curriculum in a wide variety of ways. I look forward to the time when all schools will be taking part in this scheme."

Growers and processors can get involved by distributing recruitment flyers, which are available from the Potato Council, or becoming a school buddy and assisting with planting and harvesting.

Register at www.potatoesforschools.org.uk or contact Sue Lawton on 024 7647 8774 or slawton@potato.org.uk.


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