Growers take climate change clarion call to Copenhagen

Growers and farmers have told world leaders in Copenhagen they can and will help still the "perfect storm" of soaring demand for food, water and energy.

Agriculture "can and will be part of the solution to climate change", the NFU told the Copenhagen climate change summit last week.

Combinable Crops Board chairman Ian Backhouse said farming could help avert what Government chief scientist John Beddington recently called a perfect storm. "But we will need the co-operation of our governments, the private sector, non-government organisations, the public and media," he added.

"Increasing productivity is critical to improving the adaptive capacity of both rich and poor farmers against climate change, to enhance food security and to reduce pressure on our natural environment."

Dr Jonathan Scurlock, the NFU's chief adviser on renewable energy and climate change, went to the summit with Backhouse and highlighted four main themes for tackling climate change.

These included increased greenhouse gas efficiency, enhanced carbon storage in vegetation and soils, a wide range of bio-energy technologies to displace fossil fuel use and uptake of other renewable energies such as wind and solar power.


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

Horticulture education update - staying on course

Horticulture education update - staying on course

Raised levels of investment in horticulture education and increased student take-up is welcome news for the industry, says Rachel Anderson.

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

This spring, many top-fruit growers in the UK and across Europe were dismayed to discover that swathes of their orchards had been hit by frost.

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

Upcoming reforms to water abstraction licensing will for the first time cap the amount of water that fruit growers can take for trickle irrigation.