Greenvale launches 'environmentally friendly' potato variety

Greenvale has launched a new 'environmentally friendly' potato variety, which it claims is also cheap and easy to maintain.

The new Vale Sovereign potato, designed to be 'environmentally friendly' - photo: Greenvale
The new Vale Sovereign potato, designed to be 'environmentally friendly' - photo: Greenvale


The Vales Sovereign has the classic large oval shape, with red blushes to the skin and is designed to be an ‘all rounder', Greenvale said.

The variety was bred by the Scottish Crop Research Institute (SCRI) to be more environmentally friendly than other varieties, requiring less water and less nitrogen fertiliser - enabling growers to reduce their carbon footprint and cut costs.

Greenvale also claimed the potato is more resistant to diseases, doesn't bruise easily and always gives a high yield, regardless of weather conditions - hot, dry, cold or wet.

The Vales Sovereign also has a superior flavour compared to other all-rounder potatoes, according to Greenvale business development manager, Paul Edwards:

"Many of the all-rounder potato varieties currently on the market tend to have a rather floury texture.

"We've bred Vales Sovereign to combine the best of British - the texture and creamy flavour that put the 'Great' in British potato recipes."

In addition, said Greenvale, the potato is naturally dormant during storage, meaning it can be stored longer than many other varieties without needing refrigeration or artificial inhibitors to keep the potatoes from sprouting.

Vales Sovereign is currently available in 1kg and 2kg packs from Tesco stores nationwide.

For more information visit the Greenvale AP website at www.greenvale.co.uk.


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