Fruit Logistica innovation award shortlist announced

Ireland's Holfeld Plastics is a finalist for the the Fruit Logistica innovation award with a recycled packaging product.

RPetEco
RPetEco

 

Fruit Logistica global brand manager Gerald Lamusse said: "The tenth annual Fruit Logistica Innovation Award honours outstanding new fruit and vegetable industry products and services that are driving new trends in the international marketplace. Regarded as the industry's most coveted distinction, this award attracts huge media attention worldwide."

After reviewing more than 60 entries for the FLIA 2015, a panel of experts from production and quality management, the wholesale and retail trade, and the packaging and service industries selected the following 10 nominees:

1. Aviv Flowers Packing House, Israel: "Aurora Seedless Papaya" – A small, seedless variety of papaya

2. Bakker Barendrecht, The Netherlands: "DIY fresh packs" –Packages of mixed fruits/vegetables with additional ingredients and recipes for specific dishes

3. Cabka Group, Germany: "Eye-Catcher" – A product display system for crates at the POS

4. Atlas Pacific Engineering, USA: "FC 15 Fruit Chunker" – A cutting machine for pineapple and melons

5. Polymer Logistics, Germany: "Holzdekor-RPC" – Reusable plastic crates with a natural wood look

6. BelOrta, Belgium: "Lemoncherry" – A variety of yellow cherry tomato

7. Holfeld Plastics, Ireland: "Low Carbon rPETeCo" – A packaging material consisting of 90 per cent recycled plastic bottles

8. Sunforest, South Korea: "Portable Nondestructive Fruit Quality Meter" – A portable quality-control measuring device

9. Regal'in Europe, France: "Regal'in™ Apple" – A new apple variety

10. Hepro, Germany: "UP-8000" – A peeling machine for carrots, cucumbers, white radishes and other long vegetables

These 10 innovations will be presented at the Berlin show from 4-6 February 2015 in a special display area between Halls 20 and 21, where the award ceremony will take place on 6 February at 14:30. On the first two days of the trade fair, more than 60,000 trade visitors from around 130 countries will have the chance to vote for the innovation of the year.


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