Fresh Produce Consortium questions carbon footprint claims

Consumers who think eating seasonal fruit and vegetables reduces their carbon footprint significantly may be kidding themselves, according to latest research.

The Fresh Produce Consortium (FPC) criticised the "plethora of confusing claims about green credentials" in response to the document from the Food Ethics Council.

What Should Supermarkets Do About Seasonal Food? looked at claims by retailers, campaigners and the Government on the environmental impact of seasonal fresh produce.

The report highlighted analysis suggesting that "eating fresh produce that is in season represents the lowest environmental impact".

However, the study added that other differences in production, transport and storage could outweigh seasonal effect.

An FPC spokesman said: "There's a lot of debate on eating in season and it tends to be defined as British or local. We are saying in season can mean globally sourced."

Chief executive Nigel Jenney warned against implying that produce grown indoors, imported or stored may not be as responsible towards the environment.

Fruit and vegetables could be enjoyed in season throughout the year thanks to our global market, he said. Around 60 per cent of fruit and vegetables are imported.


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

Horticulture education update - staying on course

Horticulture education update - staying on course

Raised levels of investment in horticulture education and increased student take-up is welcome news for the industry, says Rachel Anderson.

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

This spring, many top-fruit growers in the UK and across Europe were dismayed to discover that swathes of their orchards had been hit by frost.

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

Upcoming reforms to water abstraction licensing will for the first time cap the amount of water that fruit growers can take for trickle irrigation.