Food for London 2012 will be Red Tractor-assured

Growers are limbering up for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games after learning most of the food for the event will be Red Tractor-assured.

Olympic organisers launched their "food vision" last week for "the largest peacetime catering operation in the world", with more than 500 tonnes of fruit, vegetables and potatoes.

London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games said it had committed itself to providing the most sustainable games in history. The announcement is a coup for the NFU, which has been in talks with the committee for a year.

Seasonally or realistically available fruit, vegetables, salads, meat and dairy products must be farmed in the UK, traceable and produced to strict standards from farm to venue.

Some 14 million meals will be served up totalling 232 tonnes of potatoes and more than 330 tonnes of fruit and vegetables.

Lee Woodger, head of the NFU's food-chain unit, said: "This is the first time food standards have been looked at on this scale and the first time an Olympic Games has even considered food sustainability."

The NFU will "facilitate" contact between growers and farmers and food-service organisations and may run industry days to bring them together, he added.

Woodger said mainland European firms could technically sign up to the Red Tractor standard but could not carry the British logo and the Olympics organiser was focusing on the UK market.


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