Five a day the British way

"Get your five a day the British way" is the message that the NFU hopes to get across to UK consumers through its Why Horticulture Matters campaign.

The organisation has teamed up with the Department of Health to promote the Five A Day initiative - which encourages people to eat a minimum of five portions of fruit and vegetables a day.

Eating five portions of fruit and vegetables a day is said to reduce the risks of cancer, heart disease and other chronic illnesses.

The Why Horticulture Matters campaign has added a twist to this message by encouraging consumers to eat fruit and vegetables that are British-grown and in-season.

The NFU hopes the "five a day the British way" slogan will highlight how eating British fruit and vegetables is good for people's health and the nation's economy. The union is using an image of Adam and Eve to plug this message.

Chairman of the NFU horticulture board Richard Hirst said: "We wanted to capture the public's imagination with this image and chose Adam and Eve as iconic figures synonymous with eating the apple. (Apples) are just one of the great British offerings and we want people to embrace this idea of eating their five a day the British way.

"To help, we have a seasonal chart available on our website and we hope consumers will get on board by taking these ideas to the supermarkets and buying fresh fruit and vegetables produced by our growers."

See www.whyfarmingmatters.co.uk.


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