First British Sugar TOPSOIL bursary recipient named

The first person to benefit from British Sugar Topsoil's new bursary Is Richard Johnstone, a 34-year old golf course manager from Nairn in the north of Scotland.

Richard Johnstone is keen to develop his managerial skills. Image: British Sugar Topsoil
Richard Johnstone is keen to develop his managerial skills. Image: British Sugar Topsoil

The bursary was created by the soil supplier as it marked 20 years in business and supports anyone in the greenkeeping, groundsmanship, landscape contracting or garden design sectors who can demonstrate they would benefit from financial support to help develop their skills and knowledge.

Johnstone has worked at Nairn Dunbar Golf Links since leaving school at 17, working his way up to the position of golf course manager. He will use the £500 bursary to pay for the first year of a three year HND in Golf Course Management starting in August. He has already achieved a number of qualifications since joining the club in 2000.

He said: "I completed an HNC in Golf Course Management in 2012 and although my club has always been very supportive, it currently has more pressing demands on its resources and cannot afford to make further education a priority. It has taken me 17 years to work my way up the ladder and I am determined to improve and develop as a course manager. The HND includes units specific to a managerial role so being awarded this bursary by British Sugar TOPSOIL is great and will help me to fulfil my ambitions as a professional greenkeeper and golf course manager."

National TOPSOIL manager Andy Spetch will follow Johnstone’s progress and invite him to relevant events and exhibitions as a guest of the company. 


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