Firm battles to save pesticide

Dow AgroSciences (DAS) is fighting to give soil nematicide Telone II an extra 18 months' use after the EU dropped it from Annex 1 last year.

Nematologist Dr Pat Haydock of Harper Adams University College, Shropshire, told growers at last week's East Midlands Potato Day that the chemical company hopes to get an 18-month "grace period" to extend the product's withdrawal deadline from 20 March 2009 until September 2010.

He also revealed that DAS has applied to get the product back on the register so that it can be used by growers in the long term.

"DAS expects its re-submission application for Annex 1 listing to be successful and that, therefore, the fumigant's long-term availability in the UK and other EU countries will be maintained."

Haydock added grower support for the re-registration will help Dow's chances of success.


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