English & Welsh Wine of the Year Competition hosts declare 2010 best year ever

This year's English & Welsh Wine of the Year Competition results are announced today, with more medals awarded than ever before, acknowledging the high quality of wines and winemaking coming from the UK.

This year's competition - judged by a panel of five masters of wine chaired by Susan McCraith - saw a record number of entries from England and Wales recorded following the last year's large harvest.

McCraith said: "As a panel we were all very impressed with the quality of this year's entries. We were delighted to award a record number of Gold medals across all the categories. The still rose category was the highest quality we've seen - truly world-class - and the red categories were the best we've ever tasted.

"The dry white wines impressed us greatly and showed that the aromatic qualities of the grape varieties grown - particularly Bacchus - are a highly successful style here in the UK. There were some real stars in the sparkling wine categories to rival some of the best in the world. My congratulations to all entrants and winners. There is a lot to be proud about."

Sian Liwicki, general secretary of the United Kingdom Vineyards Association (UKVA), which organises the competition, said: "We were delighted to see such a large number of entries. The large number of awards reflects the quality of our industry's wines and our growing confidence. My thanks on behalf of the UKVA go to the judges for the expertise and professionalism that they brought to the judging - we are thrilled with the results."

Ridgeview Wine Estate won the Gore-Browne Trophy for the Wine of the Year award for the second year in a row. This year it won the award for its Grosvenor Blanc de Blancs 2001, bottled in magnums. The wine also scooped the trophy for Best Sparkling Wine.

The McAlpine Trophy for Winemaker of the Year was awarded for the second time to Sam Lindo of Camel Valley, who first won the title in 2007.


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