Dutch fruit tree supplier invests in cold storage

A major Dutch fruit tree grower says its €1.2m investment in cold storage will enable it to provide fruit growers with trees in optimal condition when they are required for planting - which increasingly is in April.

Fleuren's €1.2m fruit tree cold store. Credit: Fleuren
Fleuren's €1.2m fruit tree cold store. Credit: Fleuren

Fleuren Tree Nursery owner Han Fleuren says: "We realised we had to store trees because growers want to plant them late - that's what they've been advised by their consultants."
The 18,000 cu m facility can store 800,000 trees under computer-controlled climate conditions. "Three-quarters of the trees are sold before they come into it," Fleuren adds. Customers pay for each month that trees are stored at the facility after harvesting. The store remains empty from June to November.
The company has also launched what it believes is an improvement to the widely used Quince MC pear rootstock. Quince Eline yields smoother less russet Conference pears.
Fleuren has also invested in netting machines, one of which is mounted on its specially commissioned €70,000 tree lifter, to reduce damage to trees.


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