Dutch export more fruit and vegetables to Russia, less to Western Europe

The reorientation of Dutch fresh produce exports from West to East is continuing, new industry figures show.

During the first three quarters of this year, fruit and vegetable exports to the UK, excluding onions, fell by 6 per cent compared with 2011, to 250,000 tonnes. Aubergines, leeks and iceberg lettuce were among only a few crops to buck the downward trend.

Exports to France were down 5 per cent, while those to Germany held broadly level. But exports to Russia rose 21 per cent to 85,000 tonnes, with significant rises in pears, peas and tomatoes more than offsetting dips in exports of apples, cabbage and sweet pepper.

Exports of onions, data on which are collected separately, showed a 3 per cent rise to the UK over the period, to 85,000 tonnes.

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