Dutch announce research themes for low-energy protected horticulture

Organisers of the Dutch horticulture sector's Kas als Energiebron (Glasshouse as Energy Source) research programme has announced the next seven projects it will undertake.

Image: Josef Stuefer (CC BY 2.0)
Image: Josef Stuefer (CC BY 2.0)

Reduced from a shortlist of 20 proposals presented last month, the seven are:

  • A continuation of the energy-efficient "Het Nieuwe Telen" (New Cultivation) approach to growing sweet peppers;
  • "A healthy tomato plant with little gas" in the 2SavenEnergy research glasshouse;
  • Monitoring energy innovations in practice;
  • Photosynthesis of strawberry under lighting;
  • Better light use with green light;
  • Smart materials for glasshouses;
  • More screening in Gerbera without quality loss.

The programme is funded by the Dutch government and industry body LTO Glaskracht Nederland. Its overall aim is to is to reduce the carbon footprint of the Dutch glasshouse horticulture by 2-3 per cent per year.


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