Dragons back hosepipe-ban busting device

Dragons' Den judge James Caan has invested £200,000 in a firm that invented a product to help gardeners cope with a hosepipe ban.

Dragons' Den judges fight to invest in Planit Products watering device - photo: Planit Products
Dragons' Den judges fight to invest in Planit Products watering device - photo: Planit Products

Two Dragons, Caan and Duncan Bannatyne, fought to invest in the Malvern-based Planit Products business during last Monday's BBC2 show.

One of Planit's products is the H2Go Barrow Bag, which can be fitted into a wheelbarrow to allow 80 litres of water to be transported and poured through a fitted spout.

It will be launched at Glee on 20-23 September at Birmingham's NEC (Hall 5, stand E11).

The bag will be on sale from November, retailing at £9.99.


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