Classen DS20 Drill Seeder

This machine is not cheap to buy but if using a tractor or turf vehicle is out of the question, this could be the solution to your problems. We reckon it should be particularly useful on those awkward sites and areas with restricted access.

One look at the Classen and it is obvious that a lot of thought has gone into it. This ingeniously designed machine is made with convenience, low mainten-ance and safety in mind. It is self-propelled, with front-wheel drive, for ease of operation. There’s plenty of pull and we like the fact it is a Honda engine — it’s going to be reliable and easy to look after. It has chain drive to the wheels and v-belts to the blade reel.
For a pedestrian seeder it has a nice turn of speed — happily chugging along at a very acceptable walking pace around 4km/h. And with an overall width of 91cm, getting into back gardens or onto bowling greens should be straightforward. There are no parts sticking out where they could be knocked and damaged. Even the wire-reinforced, clear plastic, seed-delivery tubes are tucked away in the machine’s main frame. Yet getting to any component for maintenance is unlikely to be a problem.
Our tester says: “Everything is very accessible. The air filter is on top with just a wing nut to get at it. The dipstick is easily recognisable. All the controls are clearly marked and identifiable. Everything you need is within easy reach yet there are no levers positioned where they might stick stab the operator or get broken off or bent.”
Construction is strong with its 4.5mm thick sheet steel. The tester adds: “This is a serious piece of kit. The build quality is good and it should be ideal for contractors.”
Using the Classen is simple and there are some nice details to benefit the operator. For instance, instructions and seed rates for different mixtures are printed on the underside of the hopper lid — there’s no need to pop back to the office to check the rate when swapping from one seed to another. And it’s hard to imagine a simpler way of changing the rate — find the marker on the gauge, tighten the knob and move the arm across — no spanners needed. All seed types can be accommodated. Sowing depth is adjustable via a fingertip screwdown to 3.8mm.
Being a drill seeder, the Classen does sow in rows. Heat-treated, high-carbon steel blades, spaced at five-centimetre intervals across the 51cm working width, form the grooves into which the seed falls. You’ll probably want to run over the ground in a couple of directions to remove the geometry from the end result. Turf tread pneumatic tyres are fitted for minimal marking.

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