CIPC action plan aims to keep residues below limit

A new action plan for sprout-suppressant chlorpropham (CIPC) is a "last-chance saloon" for the product, Certis sales manager Peter Shakespeare told potato growers.

Shakespeare said at last week's East Midlands Potato Day that if people do not take the plan seriously then CIPC "will not last".

He said: "We have to use it more effectively and efficiently to get down these residues. It's not possible to use CIPC without leaving a residue but we have to work closer to get to the maximum residue level (MRL). If that can be achieved then we can keep it in the future."

Residue sampling by the Government's Pesticide Residues Committee (PRC) showed a risk of it exceeding the 10mg/kg MRL.

The action plan was drawn up by the CIPC Stewardship Group, which was formed in January after the Advisory Committee on Pesticides (ACP) said the potato industry should work together to eliminate CIPC's residue "anomalies".

ACP ruled that, if potatoes are treated with more than 36gai/tonne, they should only be used for processing. It also said the maximum amount of active substance applied to potatoes for processing must be 63.75g/tonne.

As part of its action plan the group - chaired by Potato Council's Mike Storey and made up of industry representatives and scientists - is communicating these new guidelines to the industry.

It is also reviewing and monitoring data on CIPC use - including voluntary submissions of residues data by processors and packers.


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