Chitosan extracted from cultured fungi launched for pest and disease control

Following a year of trials, Plater Bio is manufacturing the natural ingredient chitosan extracted from cultured fungi for pest and disease control in agriculture and horticulture.

Dr Russell Sharp
Dr Russell Sharp
Plater Bio is the only manufacturer of fungal chitosan outside of China.
The manufacturer said Chitosan is suitable for organic usage, allowing organic farmers access to what it says is an effective product to control diseases instead of the use of synthetic pesticides.
Unlike the vast majority of chitosan, imported from Asia and made from seafood waste (prawn heads and crab shells), Plater Bio’s chitosan is produced from fungi, therefore suitable when vegetarian ingredients are required.
Aside from protecting crops from fungi and bacterial diseases, chitosan can be used for clarifying real ale and cleaning polluted water, the company said.
Since 2014, EU ‘basic substance’ regulations have allowed for the use of chitosan, which, the firm said, activates the plants' own defences against disease.
The supplier said reduced costs and ease of supply now makes chitosan a "viable option for organic farmers and also conventional farmers, who are seeing the number of active pesticides dwindling" as conventional synthetic products are withdrawn.
Plater Bio technical director Dr Russell Sharp said: "At Plater Bio we are very excited about the benefits this revolutionary product can offer to farmers and the brewing industry."

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