Chemicals campaign aims to still public fear

The Crop Protection Association (CPA) will aim to convince a wider audience of the importance of crop protection products, according to chief executive Dominic Dyer.

"We will be talking more to the public and to wildlife and conservation organisations in the coming year," he told Grower. "You will see more events, seminars and conferences. We must engage even with people who are suspicious about our motives."

Pointing to the success of CPA-supported debates at Conservative and Labour Party conferences this year, Dyer said: "We have made progress and want to continue that.

"We need people to understand the economic importance of crop protection chemicals that underpin the whole food chain. The pressures on the industry won't go away as people continue to feel the squeeze."

He added that a challenge will come from the issue of bystander exposure. "There are proposals to tighten this up and the industry needs to make clear there isn't a huge pubic health issue here," he pointed out.

"We don't need more buffer zones or public notifications before spraying. We don't want a knee-jerk reaction that will lead to more and more restrictions."


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