British provenance focus at Morrisons

Morrisons is to highlight the British provenance of seasonal fresh produce lines as part of its Fresh In campaign, which is about to start its second year.

The supermarket's campaign will kick-off next week with the arrival in store of Jersey Royal potatoes and will later include British strawberries and apples.

It will also highlight the regional variations available in specific stores, such as Kentish and Cornish loose potatoes.

Morrisons head of produce Andrew Garton explained: "We are committed to sourcing British wherever possible and our Fresh In campaign will enable us to showcase our fresh, British produce when it is at its very best and most affordable."

He added: "Our strong relationships with British farmers help us to get items from the field to our stores as quickly as possible."


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