British Edible Pulse Association rewards best-performing crops

The British Edible Pulse Association (BEPA) has singled out winners for its annual pulse competition, rewarding the best-performing crops this year.

BEPA president Phil Rix awarded a gong to Jed Booth of JN Booth & Sons for his best sample of large blue peas.

Mark Button of Dengie Crops won a prize for marrowfats peas, human-consumption beans and other peas.

Peter Daubney of Openfield submitted the winning entry of large blue peas.

Rix said the competition aimed to encourage pulse growing and underline the returns that good pulse growers can achieve.

"We had 76 entries from our merchant members and the excellent harvest results are reflected in the quality of the winning entries as well as the yields and returns."

 

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