Brassica Alert service extends to cover growers in Lincolnshire Fens and Wash

The Syngenta Brassica Alert SMS service - which sends alerts to growers' mobile phones - has been extended to cover localised disease warnings across key areas of the Lincolnshire Fens and Wash.

The extension of the service follows trials for the past two seasons on the exisiting service - which alerts growers to the risk of ringspot, Alternaria and white blister.

The Brassica Alert SMS also now includes information on the numbers of diamondback moth, silver Y moth and thrips being found in crops across the region.

The system works by sending growers information gathered from the monitoring site closest to their local growing conditions.

It was developed and is managed in conjunction with the Lincolnshire-based Allium & Brassica Centre (ABC), and uses a "traffic light" approach to alert growers to impending risk in a weekly SMS message. ABC director Andy Richardson said: "The new system has been designed to give growers quick information that can be readily utilised when making crop walking decisions in the field."

In the first week of July, Brassica Alert identified that weather conditions had already created a moderate risk of white blister attack in five of the seven monitoring areas.

Richardson said: "The forecast is intended to focus growers' crop inspections for white blister. We advise fungicide applications of either Folio Gold for sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli, or Fubol Gold on cabbage, as soon as symptoms are identified on plants."

Pest warnings are based on pheromone and sticky traps placed in-crop on the monitoring sites, alerting growers to potential problems that may be found in their own fields.

- For further details visit www.syngenta-crop.co.uk and click on the link for Brassica Alert.


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