Bramley apple production pioneer dies

John Acock, a pioneering force in Bramley apple production, has died aged 79.

The founder of Fourayes Farm in Sittingbourne was managing director and chairman of the firm until his retirement in 1994.

Philip Acock, his son and current managing director, said: "He contributed an awful lot to the Bramley industry and had a pretty damn good life."

John is credited with revolutionising the processing of Bramley apples for bakers, and helping to make Fourayes the largest apple processor in the UK.

His was the first company in the UK to install the semi-automatic system of peeling, and the first to boot up an Atlas Pacific fully automatic system.

John began his career in the growing sector after national service by working on a fruit farm in Brenchley, Kent. He studied fruit and hops at Kent Farm Institute.

He was a community stalwart and worked for Devon Air Ambulance, Combe Raleigh Parish Meeting and South Green Methodist Church.

John Acock, who died of lung cancer, leaves wife Doreen, son Philip, two daughters, three granddaughters and three grandsons.


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