Bramley apple crop late and reduced due to cold

The cool April weather has meant this year's Bramley apple crop will be late as well as much reduced in volume, according to English Apples & Pears chief executive Adrian Barlow.

Growers have grubbed up Bramley orchards in recent years due to insufficient returns, he said, adding: "At the very least this cold weather is going to make the season later. The first supplies will probably start coming in August and will be restricted so the majority of supply won't be ready to harvest until September."

But Phil Acock, managing director of specialist Fourayes Farm in Kent that claims to be the UK's largest fruit processor, said: "The reported upcoming shortages shouldn't affect us as we have managed our stocks accordingly to get us neatly to new season. I don't disagree though on returns being too low for growers and this of course is a long-term concern, as we really don't want to lose too much to grubbing."


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

What challenges and opportunities lie in store for tomato growers?

What challenges and opportunities lie in store for tomato growers?

The British Tomato Growers Association (TGA) conference today (21 September) heard a range of perspectives on what changes lie in store for the sector and how to anticipate them.

Buoyant demand for UK apples but frost and labour remain concerns

Buoyant demand for UK apples but frost and labour remain concerns

As the British apple season begins, English Apples & Pears (EAP) is warning that growers will feel the effects of both a late frost in spring and also constrained labour supply.

Tomorrow's tractors

Tomorrow's tractors

These machines have advanced rapidly over recent years but what does the future hold? Sally Drury looks ahead.


Follow us on:
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google +
Horticulture Jobs
More Horticulture Jobs

Pest & Disease Tracker bulletin 

The latest pest and disease alerts, how to treat them, plus EAMU updates, sent direct to your inbox.

Sign up here

Professor Geoffrey Dixon

GreenGene International chair Geoff Dixon on the business of fresh produce production
 

Read Professor Geoffrey Dixon