Biochar trial among professionals yields positive results

A Soil Association commercial biochar trial with professional horticulturists has yielded positive results.

The Carbon Gold products are in 90 garden centres but are now being promoted to professional growers.

Some 19 growers trialled the Soil Association-approved, peat-free products. They were found to help boost root growth, reduce the need to water and improve germination rates.

Carbon Gold executive chairman Craig Sams will be launching the results at the Soil Association's Soil Symposium on 15 November.

Delfland Nurseries co-owner John Overvoorde trialled GroChar Seed Compost on young lettuce and brassicas. "I use Klasmann modular compost and biochar did just as well. I also use Klasmann peat-free and there's not much in it."

He said he would contract grow a "reasonably-sized" order in biochar if asked and expects his first customer by early 2013.

Great Dixter head gardener Fergus Garrett said: "Excellent peat substitute, better than green waste. Would not hesitate to use as part of a John Innes mix."

Rijk Zwaan field trials manager Martin Kyte said: "I started trialling Carbon Gold's GroChar Composts against a peat-based compost but the results were so good I stopped the trials and progressed solely with GroChar."


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

This spring, many top-fruit growers in the UK and across Europe were dismayed to discover that swathes of their orchards had been hit by frost.

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

Upcoming reforms to water abstraction licensing will for the first time cap the amount of water that fruit growers can take for trickle irrigation.

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

At a debate during last week's Fruit Focus trade show in Kent, senior industry figures painted a bleak picture of an increasingly difficult seasonal labour market that is already impacting on investment.