Arb trade body launches code of practice for working at height

The Arboricultural Association has launched a new Industry Code of Practice (ICoP) for Tree Work at Height, the development of which has been sponsored by STIHL and the C&G NPTC Fund.

Image: Keith Laverack
Image: Keith Laverack

The aim of the document is to provide consistent and safe methods for managing resources, personnel and equipment to ensure safe and efficient working practices at height.

While not intended to be a technical guide to detailed processes, it is expected that such guides will emerge in the future and will refer to the ICoP.

Arboricultural Association senior technical officer Simon Richmond said: "This marks yet another step forward in the continuing professional development of the industry."

The document, in Word format, can be downloaded from http://www.trees.org.uk/Help-becoming-an-ArbAC#icop.


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