The 1990s

At Heligan in Cornwall derelict gardens are discovered by Tim Smit and John Willis sparking a restoration project that continues to this day.

The working prototype of a transplanting machine capable of handling up to 300,000 bedding plants in an eight hour day is one of the major attractions at the American Grower Expo in Illinois, Horticulture Week reports.

The Institute of Horticultural Research merges with three former experimental horticulture stations, Efford, Kirton and Stockbridge House, to form Horticulture Research International (HRI). A component of this re-organisation was the closure of the Glasshouse Crops Research Institute site in 1995.

The RHS takes over the running of the Hampton Court Palace Flower Show started in 1990 by Network Southeast.

Mr and Mrs Dick Robinson give RHS Hyde Hall, in Essex to the Society.

An unusual stand of trees is discovered in Wollemi National Park within 200 kilometres of Sydney, Australia. The trees are found to represent an entirely new genus and species, Wollemia nobilis, in the Araucariaceae.

York Gate garden near Leeds is bequeathed to the Royal Gardeners Benevolent Society. It continues to be thought of as one of the best small gardens in Britain.

The Heritage Lottery Fund’s Urban Parks Programme established to fund the restoration of historic parks.  Over four years, under the stewardship of Stewart Harding, £185m is awarded for restoration work to 200 public parks.

Monsanto introduces Roundup Ready soybean seed, the first genetically modified herbicide tolerant agricultural crop.

The Landscape Institute is granted a Royal Charte; and the Koro Field Topmaker is introduced to renovate sports turf surfaces.

An inquiry by the Environment, Transport and Regional Affairs Select Committee of the House of Commons brings the plight of parks which have suffered from years of underfunding to the forefront. Its final report recommends the establishment of a national agency for parks.

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